Saturday, September 14, 2019

Nathaniel Michael has his eyes set on Cambridge

Like many others, Nathaniel Michael is a year 12 student gearing up to start his application for the University of Cambridge. 'Nathaniel is 17 and lives in East London, his parents arrived in England 20 years ago from Ethiopia. “It's not just the interview. People from the background we come from, they're more fearful to go into a different environment quickly. If we encourage them, show them its possible, then we would see a much more diverse university" explained Nathaniel.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Monday, September 9, 2019

Dakota Fanning responds to backlash over Ethiopian Muslim role in new film

The 25-year-old actress came under fire this week when reports showed photos of her starring in the film “Sweetness in the Belly” as a Muslim woman in Ethiopia. 'All the outrage for Dakota Fanning playing a white Ethiopian in the film version of Sweetness in the Belly is nonsense. She hasn’t taken a role from a black actor. The character is white in the book. It really wouldn’t take much research to find this out before raging about it

Ethiopia has caught gambling fever

Ethiopia was until recently a laggard. Addis Ababa had a hotel casino in the time of Emperor Haile Selassie, but this was closed by the Marxist junta known as the Derg in the 1980s. Its successor, the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, shared the Derg’s suspicion of gambling. The first betting licence was not granted until 2013 and the market remained mostly empty until 2016. Foreign firms are still prohibited. 'Recent improvements in Ethiopia’s telecoms infrastructure help explain the boom. “Without internet you couldn’t do anything,” says Michael Demissew of Abyssinia Bet, a gambling firm that uses mobile money. The government has also softened its stance since the appointment of Abiy Ahmed, the relatively liberal prime minister, last year. It has allowed gambling advertisements on radio and television and may soon permit casinos. It is motivated by the potential for new tax revenue, says Sophonias.

Friday, September 6, 2019

North Texas Ethiopian community has grown to around 40,000 people

Ethiopian New Year is next week, and the Ethiopian community in North Texas will start celebrating this weekend at a festival in Garland. 'The North Texas Ethiopian community has grown to around 40,000 people. And with that, Ethiopians have created spaces for themselves, like restaurants, grocery stores and churches, and this weekend's festival.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Ethiopian shops looted in Johannesburg due to low unemployment

Ethiopian, Somali and Nigerian nationals have had their shops targeted since the violence began.  “The situation today was relatively calm. We did not witness any incidents of looting on our streets,” Abdul Mohamed, an Ethiopian textile dealer who operates a store in downtown Johannesburg, told Anadolu Agency.

Rahwa Sebhatu and her family was deported from Ethiopia to Eritrea in 1988

In an instant, Rahwa Sebhatu went from a privileged child of a business owner to a stranger who didn't belong in her own country -- Ethiopia. 'But that May, war broke out between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea. During the two-year conflict that ensued, thousands of people of Eritrean origin, like Sebhatu's parents, would be deported from Ethiopia.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Tegegne Mersha used to make $200 a day before Uber came to Seattle and now rarely takes home more than $100 a day

Seattle’s taxis are hanging on as Uber and Lyft lose billions As Uber and other TNCs have unleashed an all-out price war against the taxi companies, many were predicting their outright extinction. Instead, most of those companies, including Yellow Cab, Orange Cab, E-Cab, Farwest Taxi and Green Cab, are still on the road. In fact, the fleet of taxis licensed by the city has actually grown 22 percent, to 844, since 2015.

Bruk Simon is a freshman studying computer science engineering at LeTourneau University

International student Bruk Simon of Ethiopia speaks Friday about the process of coming to the U.S. to attend LeTourneau University in the Anna Lee and Sidney Allen Family Student Center. 'When Bruk Simon was on his way to Longview from Ethiopia, he was flagged by the federal Transportation Security Administration more than once. But he said one thought helped him deal with the stress — that he soon would be at a good school.

Teff has three times more iron and almost twice as much fiber as traditional grains, and a more complete suite of amino acids

UC Davis researcher Gizaw Wolde inspects a test crop of the Ethiopian grain teff. 'Researchers at UC Davis have been looking into teff’s suitability for growth in California for years and are now launching a market study to gauge demand. lags behind Australia, Holland, Germany and several other European food powerhouses that have been growing teff for food, anticipating a further surge in global demand.

Monday, September 2, 2019

Ethiopian Orthodox in Nova Scotia community aims to build new church as membership swells

The Ethiopian Orthodox community spent the long weekend fundraising to build a new church. Its current space has become too small for its growing congregation. 'Debre Siyon Saint Mary's Ethiopian Tewahedo Church has been holding mass out of a smaller building on Prospect Road in Goodwood, N.S., for five years. The plan is to build the new church on the same property behind the current building.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Worku Bedasso is a Moscow Metro’s train driver

In Soviet times, the young lieutenant of the Ethiopian Navy came here to study on an exchange program: first in Georgia in 1985, and a couple of years later in Azerbaijan. While Worku was learning how to build socialism, a civil war broke out in his native Ethiopia, and “old-school” officers were no longer needed by the new state. His wife and children remained in Ethiopia; they did not want to go to Russia. A few weeks later, the Soviet Union collapsed and foreign students based in Baku were sent to Moscow. In Moscow, he was granted refugee status and issued with a work permit; however, during the 1998 economic crisis it was hard to find work. Then, his new Russian girlfriend, Olga, suggested he try working at a metro depot, since he was good with machinery. After six months of training, the former officer became a metro driver assistant.

The Shadow King, new novel from Maaza Mengiste

A gripping novel set during Mussolini’s 1935 invasion of Ethiopia, The Shadow King takes us back to the first real conflict of World War II, casting light on the women soldiers who were left out of the historical record. With the threat of Mussolini’s army looming, recently orphaned Hirut struggles to adapt to her new life as a maid in Kidane and his wife Aster’s household. Kidane, an officer in Emperor Haile Selassie’s army, rushes to mobilize his strongest men before the Italians invade.

Friday, August 30, 2019

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funding promising research to fight soil erosion in Ethiopia

One project looking at sorghum – a major cereal crop in the developing world – is the furthest along. Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Raaijmakers has sorghum field trials running in the plant’s native Ethiopia. The aim is to use feisty microbes to combat witchweed, a parasitic purple plant that decimates sorghum harvests. He’s already performing greenhouse experiments, but is cautious about the results. “It’s too early to be optimistic at this stage,” Raaijmakers says. '

International Students Face Hurdles Under Trump Administration Policy

Cottey College, a women’s college in Nevada, Mo., accepted six students from Ethiopia this year, and officials were disappointed when two of them were denied visas. They were puzzled by the reason: The students, the State Department said, did not have strong enough ties to their home country and might not return. 'The visa denials to the Ethiopian students at Cottey College were especially frustrating to college officials because the school had made a strong commitment to recruiting international students and was offering generous scholarships. “We had invested in getting them here, and they were so excited about the opportunity,” Ms. Corrigan said. “And now they can’t come.”

Ethiopian Airlines to increase flights to China to 50 per week

Ethiopian Airlines is adding flights between its African hub and Chinese cities and plans to add direct flights between Addis Ababa and Tokyo, CEO Tewolde Gebremariam told Nikkei. 'The carrier will increase its weekly flights between the Ethiopian capital and Chinese cities to 50, up from 35. The expansion is aimed at meeting the increasing demand for flights to Africa from Chinese businesspeople, investors and tourists.

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Ethiopia changing Education system starting next academic year

Ethiopia changing Education system starting next academic year It was during a press conference with local journalists that the minister for education, Tilaye Gete, disclosed that decision has been reached to introduce 6-2-4 education system.  In such an education system, students go through six years of primary education, two years of junior school and four years of high school. 

Two Ethiopians die in house fire in DC

D.C. officials said there were 12 people living in the home, which was divided up to rent to multiple people.  Because the home was not licensed as a rental, it was never inspected by the city to ensure it met fire code.

Ashenafi Belachwe becomes US citizen with a little help from the police

On Tuesday, August 20 an officer pulled over to help a man having car troubles. The officer took the man to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Office. That's where he waited as Ashenafi Belachwe put on a suit he had brought with him and went inside with the hope of a better life.

Aklilu Burayu manages four parking garages in downtown Minneapolis

“America makes you a perfect person,” Burayu, 62, reflected on a recent day outside the ramp, comparing the intensity of struggle being new in America to the crushing geological pressure that forms diamonds in the earth. “It will push you to work hard.” Burayu grew up in Ethiopia. As a young adult, he worked there as a high school teacher and writer, got married and had four children. One day, he applied for an American visa lottery and won.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Hikma spent three years in Libya being tortured

Hikma has large dark eyes and a friendly smile. A dark green two-piece veil frames her adolescent features; she is wearing a black shirt, dark jeans and trainers. "I'm fine now; I want to go to Rome to continue my studies," she says.  Even though she's only 18, Hikma has seen a lot terrible things. She fled her home in Ethopia with the goal of reaching Europe. Like many migrants who pass through Libya, she's experienced a lot of suffering.  Hikma is sitting at a small table at a hotel on the sandy beach of Guitgia on the Italian island of Lampedusa. The beach is full of bathers enjoying the clear water and summer music hits. Another young Ethiopian woman is with Hikma: 20-year-old Amina, wearing a blue hijab, a red shirt, white pants, and blue trainers. 

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Girmay Zahilay running for Metropolitan King County Council #EthiopiansInSeattle


His parents left Ethiopia as refugees in the 1980s for Sudan, where Zahilay was born. They immigrated to South Seattle, his mom working double shifts as a nursing assistant. He attended college at Stanford, where he would major in biology and serve as president of the Black Student Union. After college, he interned at the Office of White House Counsel during the Obama administration. He continued his education at University of Pennsylvania Law School. 

Monday, July 29, 2019

Dr. Taye Gonfa to start a full-time job as a family practice physician #EthiopiansInNorthCarolina



In 2000, Taye Gonfa was a medical student in Ethiopia. However, he joined hundreds of other students in a massive protest against the government that erupted in the capital city of Addis Ababa, and spread throughout the country. Gonfa and some of the other students fled to Kenya and he settled in a refugee camp. He stayed at the refugee camp for 8 years. He moved to the United States in 2008. He was eventually able to continue his education.  He graduated with a bachelor's of science degree from UNCG in just two and a half years, and was later accepted into the medical school at UNC-Chapel Hill. He did his residency at Moses Cone and is now a full-time job as a family practice physician at the same institution.